Wednesday, 13 April 2011

Benedictus benedicat!

"Let him who has been blessed, give blessing."

I would just like to thank Professor John Naughton and his team for giving me the opportunity to speak last night as part of the Arcadia lecture series at Wolfsen College, Cambridge University.

I enjoyed the most interesting of conversations with some of the students at the college, many studying post-graduate courses there. Topics included animal and human psychology, "big data and big brother", and the challenges around an internet that never forgets the content posted upon its many social media sites.

The evening included 'Formal Meal' which required jacket and tie, and (where applicable) gowns for dinner. I enjoyed the fomalised traditions around the event, from the sounding of a gong to the saying of grace in latin - Benedictus benedicat - spoken by the most senior fellow in the dining room.

It was great meeting a selection of people who read this blog (thank you!), and I thank Professor Naughton for his most excellent hospitality and for enabling me to stay overnight at the college.

1 comment:

  1. Patricia Killiard14 April 2011 at 14:50

    Hi Nick, Thanks for a great presentation at Wolfson which stimulated much thought on profiling library "customers", how we guide them through the library, both online and in buildings, and how we can engage with them at the right point.

    Libraries are increasingly focussed on re-defining their relationships with customers, particularly students, as more or them interact with us remotely. Changing the product - print to electronic - has been more straightforward than changing the customer support model - so your thoughts on the many ways that they might want to interact with us and how to engage them at different stages was especially appreciated.

    Lots of good stuff on the blog. I'll keep reading.


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